Summary

  • Higher DHA levels resulted in reduced incidence and lowered mortality associated with interstitial lung disease.


Abstract

Background: 

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, attenuates interstitial lung disease (ILD) in experimental models but human studies are lacking.

Methods: 

We examined associations of circulating levels of DHA, and other polyunsaturated fatty acids, with hospitalization and death due to ILD over 12 years in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA, n=6,573). We examined cross-sectional associations with CT lung abnormalities in MESA (2000-2012), Framingham Heart Study (2005-2011), and Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (2002-2006) Study (total n=10,193). Polyunsaturated fatty acid levels were from fasting blood samples and extracted from plasma phospholipids (MESA and Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility) or red blood cell membranes (Framingham Heart Study).

Results: 

Higher DHA levels were associated with a lower risk of hospitalisations due to ILD (adjusted rate ratio 0.69 per standard deviation increment (95% CI 0.48, 0.99) and a lower rate of death due to ILD (adjusted hazard ratio 0.68 per standard deviation increment, 95% CI 0.47, 0.98). Higher DHA was associated with less interstitial lung abnormalities on CT (pooled adjusted odds ratio 0.65 per natural log increment; 95% CI 0.46, 0.91).

Conclusions: 

Higher DHA levels were associated with a lower risk of hospitalisation and death due to ILD and less lung abnormalities on CT in a meta-analysis of population-based cohorts.

Study Source: https://academic.oup.com/aje/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/aje/kwaa168/5893036?redirectedFrom=fulltext