greatplainslab2

Key Advantages

  • The only Food Antibody Panel that includes a Candida Albicans marker
  • Can be added to the Great Plains Organic Acids Test
  • All 4 IgG Subclasses Tested (IgG 1-4)
  • Exemplary Industry Accuracy using ELISA technology
  • Easy to read report

Introduction

Immunoglobulin G (IgG) food testing is a useful guide for structuring elimination diets for patients with many chronic conditions. Individuals with neurological, gastrointestinal, movement, and behavioural disorders often suffer from IgG food sensitivities.

People may continue to eat offending foods unaware of their potential adverse effects. Symptoms associated with food sensitivities may occur hours or days after the offending food was eaten because IgG food antibodies remain for a much longer time than traditional IgE antibodies. As immunological reactions, IgE food allergy causes the release of histamine, producing an immediate hypersensitivity reaction, in which symptoms appear within minutes or hours. In contrast, food sensitivity is a non-IgE allergy characterised by the measurement of IgG antibodies specific to antigenic food proteins. This IgG food allergy is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction in which symptoms appear anywhere from hours to days after eating the offending food. Elimination of IgG-positive foods may improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, autism, AD(H)D, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and epilepsy, according to numerous clinical studies.1-8 The 93 foods tested for in the IgG Food Allergy Test w/ Candida include most classes of problem foods that can be eliminated from a patient’s diet.

PATIENTS PRACTITIONERS
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References

1. Alpay, K. et al. Diet restriction in migraine, based on IgG against foods: a clinical double-blind, randomised, cross-over Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache 30, 829-837, doi:10.1177/0333102410361404 (2010).

2. Mitchell, N. et al. Randomised controlled trial of food elimination diet based on IgG antibodies for the prevention of migraine like Nutrition journal 10, 85, doi:10.1186/1475-2891-10-85 (2011).

3. Zar, , Mincher, L., Benson, M. J. & Kumar, D. Food-specific IgG4 antibody-guided exclusion diet improves symptoms and rectal compliance in irritable bowel syndrome. Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology 40, 800-807, doi:10.1080/00365520510015593 (2005).

4. Atkinson, , Sheldon, T. A., Shaath, N. & Whorwell, P. J. Food elimination based on IgG antibodies in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomised controlled trial. Gut 53, 1459-1464, doi:10.1136/gut.2003.037697 (2004).

5. Drisko, , Bischoff, B., Hall, M. & McCallum, R. Treating irritable bowel syndrome with a food elimination diet followed by food challenge and probiotics. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 25, 514-522 (2006).

6. Bentz, S. et al. Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn’s disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention Digestion 81, 252-264, doi:10.1159/000264649 (2010).

7. Egger, , Carter, C. M., Soothill, J. F. & Wilson, J. Oligoantigenic diet treatment of children with epilepsy and migraine. The Journal of pediatrics 114, 51-58 (1989).

8. Pelsser, L. M. et al. Effects of a restricted elimination diet on the behaviour of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (INCA study): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet 377, 494-503, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(10)62227-1 (2011).

9. Veling, M. & Trevino, R. (2002). Food allergies and Alexandria, VA: American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation.

10. Dixon H, Treatment of delayed food allergy based on specific immunoglobulin G RAST testing relief. Otoloryngol Head Neck Surg 2000;123:48-54.

11. Ciao, G. et al, Effect of gluten free diet on immune response to gliadin in patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. BMC Gastroenterology 14, 26 (2014)

12. Kemeny DM, et al Sub-class of IgG in allergic disease. I. IgG sub-class antibodies in immediate and non-immediate food allergy. Clin 1986; 16:571-81

13. Hofman, T. IgE and IgG antibodies in children with food allergy. Rocz Akad Med Bialymst 40, 468-473 (1995).

14. Jenmalm, M. C. & Bjorksten, B. Cord blood levels of immunoglobulin G subclass antibodies to food and inhalant allergens in relation to maternal atopy and the development of atopic disease during the first 8 years of life. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology 30, 34-40 (2000).

15. Lucarelli, S. et al. Food allergy in cystic fibrosis. Minerva pediatrica 46, 543-548 (1994).

16. van der Woude, F. J. et al. Do food antigens play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of human glomerulonephritis? Clinical and experimental immunology 51, 587-594 (1983).